Tag Archives: 3G

Why the $99 HP TouchPad is a good purchase [Updated ]


[Updated 09/16/2011]

As a WebOS fan, I’ve been following the rise (kind of), abrupt and sudden fall, and finally the launch of the now defunct TouchPad by HP.   I certainly wanted one when the product was launched, but felt them a little pricey.  Then, came the sudden announcement that the product was killed a mere seven weeks into its life.  At that point, I no longer desired one.  Then, like a great mystery, the plot turned once again.  Now, they were $99 and like an apparently very large portion of the US consumer market, I wanted one again.  I was one of the unfortunate people caught in order limbo thinking I had one, only to have my order abruptly canceled a few days later.

So, here I am.  On the outside looking in. I’m not going to use this space to rail on the shortsightedness and lack of vision by HP. That would just be too easy.  Instead, I’ve read a fair amount of articles on why you should or should not buy one.   There are a number of them out there for your reading pleasure, but I’ve especially got to thank Bill Palmer at Beatweek for his heavy handed post that thrashed the idea of buying a TouchPad altogether.  I hope that a great many people read his article.  It will make it that much easier for me to pick one up.  In response to this post, I’m going to give you ten reasons why a $99 TouchPad is a great pickup (if you can get one)

  1. By adding the Kindle App, you get more than a Kindle for less than the price of a Kindle.  Email, browser, games, etc.  That would probably be enough, but wait.  There’s more………
  2. A FREE 50GB of storage at box.net.  That’s a $19.99 value that can be shared amongst your family.
  3. Flash!   Despite what they’d have you believe, HTML5 is not yet all the way here.  So, when you are ready to lose Apple’s Interent training wheels, you can reach for ‘that other pad’ and experience the rest of the Internet.  There are a lot of well done Flash sites out there.  It would be a shame to miss some of them.
  4. It’s a great way to un-tether from your computer.  What do most people use their tablets for?  Checking email, Twitter, Facebook, surfing the web, etc.  The TouchPad does all of that.
  5. WebOS is a great operating system.  It is easy enough that all but the most dense among us will be able to start using it productively right away.  Also, despite it’s limited lifespan in hardware, HP is still actively developing the operating system.  They really want to license the os (good luck), but if need be, they will sell it.    That would be a lot more difficult if they shuttered the project and fired all of the engineers that work on it.
  6. The Android community is very actively working on a port.  For the more technically inclined among us, you’ll be able to to run Android on some dandy hardware within the coming weeks.  Where else are you going to find an Android tablet on this kind of hardware for $99?  That’s right.  Nowhere.  For the even more geeky, there is an active project that’s porting Ubuntu Linux to the pad.  Both the Android and Ubuntu projects are currently booting from a USB stick.  Therefore, you could ultimately have your choice of three operating systems on the same hardware without any of them interfering with the others.  Where else are you going to get that?
  7. You are NOT running a big risk of getting a virus.  This is just silly. Like I said before, the operating system is still actively being developed.  Any security holes that would crop up will be addressed at least for the near term, and that’s all we’re really looking at here (see note 10). Additionally, WebOS is Linux.  It springs from the same tree as the Android and is a close cousin to iOS.  While not impervious to malware, because of the nature of Unix/Linux it’s just a lot harder to pull off and there’s just less malware out there for the platforms.
  8. If you want to get your kids a netbook, this would make a nice alternative.  There is a document editing app called Quick Office that comes with the TouchPad and Picsel Smart Office should be available within a few weeks.  It’s a great machine for simple homework and research.
  9. App developers are still actively writing apps for WebOS.  It is true that many have jumped ship and some may never return, but the fact remains that HP will wind up selling about a million TouchPads before they close the books on it for good.  That’s a million potential software buyers.  Somebody is going to meet that market even if it’s only a niche.  You won’t have the volume of apps that are available for the iPad or the Android tablets, but you WILL have options.  The second part of this is, there WILL be accessories available.  This pretty much matches my point above.  A million devices is simply going to be too much for some manufacturers to resist.  Going back to the days of Palm, WebOS fans are rabid and they will buy.  With a million devices in the wild, there will be more WebOS fans.
  10. The lifecycle of the TouchPad is going to be about the same as it will be for any other tablet.  Apple already has an end of life in mind for the iPad and iPad 2.  Don’t believe me?  Ask any iPhone 3G owner how their phone is doing.  Planned obsolescence will take the iPads out every two to three years.  You’ll be tossing out your TouchPad about that same time.  The only difference will be that you spent 1/5 to 1/8 for the TouchPad (assuming you are fortunate enough to land one for $99) and probably a lot less for apps over the course of that time.

The TouchPad may be discontinued, but it’s far from dead.  It’s a limited life appliance just like all of the other tablets on the market.  Spending $99 and using the device for two years will be money in your pocket.  Two years from now, iPad and iPad 2 owners, as well as current Android tablet owners will be actively looking to replace their tablet with the latest and greatest just like you.  The only difference is, you’ll be money ahead.

To Mr. Palmer, please write a few more scathing articles.  You’ll be doing the rest of us a favor.

Windows and Flash show up on the iPad.


Well, kind of.  Parallels 6 has been released, and along with it, Parallels Mobile.   Parallels Mobile allows you use an iPod Touch, iPhone, or iPad to remotely access a virtual session running in Parallels on a Mac.  An active Parallels account and a registered virtual machine are required.  Also, requires 3G or WiFi.  This is essentially a remote desktop connection to a running virtual machine on the Mac and  I’m not sure how useful it is, but watching Windows 7 using gestures on an iPad makes the video below very enjoyable on many levels.

Is the Apple getting soft? Flash created apps are off the naughty list for the iPhone.


Simon Howden / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Apple has announced a sudden reversal in its development conditions for its mobile devices today.  Back in April, Apple announced that the only development platform that could be used to create apps for its mobile devices was the Apple SDK (software development kit), which only runs on a Mac.  Fortunately, Cupertino has had a change of heart.  It is now just fine to develop apps with other development platforms, provided the apps don’t download any code.  Time will tell how badly the ‘no download’ condition will hamstring developers, but this is a move in the right direction.

Apple says that it has “listened to our developers”.  I’m not quite sure who they were listening to back in April when they pulled the plug on third-party development platforms.  Perhaps what they heard as they listened this time was the footsteps of developers heading to less restrictive platforms such as Android?  Regardless, it’s a win for pretty much everyone.  Adobe wasted no time in responding with glee because developers can now develop for iOS with Flash Professional CS5.  Note, that doesn’t mean that Flash will work in your web browser on your iOS devices now, it just means more sales for Adobe’s development platform.  Ultimately, it’s a win for users.  More developers will be able to develop for iOS devices now, and that means more apps for users of the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.

In addition, Apple has announced they are publishing guidelines for how the app store review process works.  This is designed to give developers a better idea of how the review process works and presumably a better shot at getting their apps approved.

Related: Mobile Crunch

NFC on the way. The smartphone is becoming the new wallet.


Francesco Marino / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

NFC World is reporting that Apple has picked up NFC (Near Field Communication)  expert Benjamin Vigier as their new mobile commerce product manager.

What’s that all about?

Near Field Communication is close range wireless technology that allows two devices to transfer data at close range (about 10cm), which basically means you tap them together to move information.  Apple’s hiring of Vigier along with a fistful of NFC patent applications would indicate that Apple is looking to add this technology to a future iPhone, perhaps even the next iPhone.  TechCrunch is reporting that Apple is already testing hardware from NFC hardware leader NXP.

What does that mean to me?

Short term, it should mean that you’ll be able to pay by tap and go with your phone at Apple partners through your iTunes account.   Of course, we’d imagine that the Apple Store would be first in line.  Go in, grab your new MacBook Pro, fire up the checkout application on your phone, tap your phone on a pad at the sales counter, and walk away.   The technology could be used anywhere from coffee shops and newspaper stands to big box retail to about anything you can buy with a credit card.  People could exchange business cards with a simple phone tap.

Longer term, imagine smart shopping carts that cross items off your list as you put them in the cart.  How about avoiding the lines and tapping your cart to checkout?  I would imagine it will take some convincing to get retailers to start ripping out their checkout counters, but that’s the kind of stuff that is possible with NFC.

Conclusion.

Apple won’t be the first to bring NFC to a mobile phone.  There are already a handful of phones that are equipped with the technology.  But, Apple will bring a ease of use to the equation and some big backing.  With 150 million iTunes accounts, the momentum should be there to get retailers on board.  Of course, you can expect Android and the rest of the phone world to step it up as well.

Personally, I’m not excited about paying by phone.  I don’t find paying by credit/debit card or cash to be an excruciating process.  NFC should be faster, but by how much?  If I have to pull up the app on my old 3G, it could actually be slower.  However, this is the future and I do see some other interesting uses for the technology.  If you embrace it, be sure to check out my post, Personal Insecurity and lock down your phone.

Better, Stronger, Faster. Speed Testing Four Models of the iPhone.


Thinking about entering the iPhone market or upgrading from an early version? Here is an interesting side by side by side by side comparo of the iPhone 2G, 3G, 3GS, and 4.  While very unscientific, you can get the point pretty easily.  There is no indication as to what version of the os each phone is running, but if you were considering spending the cash for the 4 or saving a few dollars (or avoiding that whole antenna thing) by getting the 3GS, this video will give you a decent real time comparison of the speed you’ll be giving up by saving the cash.  You’ll need to decide which you want to give up, speed or cash.

Thanks to Gizmodo for the article.